Also, what about a bike – perhaps with a electric generator that can couple to it, with a nice rack on the front or back to carry things in it? I really appreciate preparing and actually stepping into a lifestyle more reliant on my own skills and power, rather then something like a diesel generator that would be useless in the event of total system failure.
Based on this crude but honest assessment of the general public's affinity for the common bicarbonate, you'd be surprised by how much survivalists are into it (#2 on the list of "things for preppers to hoard"). They must expect some pretty serious hankerings for tasty leavened baked goods, or they have extensive phobias about the funkiness of their nuke survival backup plans.
As for the solar panels, I use a 100W Renogy solar panel, which connects to the generator giving it a pretty quick charge, given the right amount of sunlight. I have used these in conjunction with each other a number of times in different scenarios and have to say that together, they are worth the investment. In fact, the two of them together are still cheaper than most quality generators and are more sustainable to run.
Finelli sits across from me at the food court picnic table inside the Sam’s Club on Sunshine Street, where he requested we meet. The retired computer systems designer-turned–radio show host and homesteader has salt and pepper hair, wears a plaid shirt and jeans and carries a .45-caliber automatic firearm on his person (he won’t say where). Below his strong jawline hangs a leather bag full of crushed sapphire, meant to enhance his overall health. 
A ham radio is an absolute must-have if you’re a prepper. Get one. Get your license. Do it now. I have this exact radio on my Harley. It transmits on the same frequencies as your little family radios too. This has been a best-seller since it came out. The Search and Rescue guys I work with in the local Sheriff’s Office (Sheriff Joe, btw) carry this.
What’s the bare minimum you need to navigate across land?  For most people, that would be a compass and map.  A basic road map is sufficient to get a rough approximation of the lay of the land.  More detailed relief maps can help plan for elevation and estimate possible water sources but they also take up more room in your pack.  Waterproofed or laminated maps are also extremely helpful.  Lensatic compasses are the most reliable for little money.  If possible, a compass and protractor are also extremely helpful for route planning.  Obviously, not as essential but nonetheless useful.
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