"description": "Priorities in a survival situation: escape the elements, stay warm, and signal search-and-rescue teams so you're easy to find. The S.O.L. (Survive Outdoors Longer) Scout Survival Kit has you covered on all fronts. With a heat-reflective 2-person survival blanket for warmth and shelter from wind, rain, and snow, a one-hand operated Fire Lite™ striker and waterproof tinder for multiple campfires, plus a 100dB Slim Rescue Howler™ rescue whistle and Rescue Flash™ signal mirror with retro-reflective aiming aid, and a compass, duct-tape and fishing/sewing kit. Best of all, it weighs just 5.4 oz. and comes packaged in professional-grade RF-welded waterproof bag – so it's easy to take with you on all of your outdoor, wilderness, and hiking adventures. Top 10 Must Have Outdoor Survival Gear 2017 Part 2
7. Large Ferrocerium Rod & 8. Flint with Striker: Up to 12,000 strikes from thick 5/16"(8mm) ferrocerium rod.Sparks shower at 5,500º F(3,000º C) to ignite a fire in any weather (even wet), at any altitude.Perfect for backpacking, hiking, camping, hunting, fishing, bugout, every day carry, emergency, survival, campfires, cooking, gas stoves, and more
That aside, bushcraft is not intended to be a survival ordeal when going out into the wilds of wherever we live. Bushcraft by definition is the skill of living in the wild. That doesn’t mean we need to deprive ourselves of modern tools and equipment. If you are comfortable heading out with nothing but a pair of shorts and a hat, then do that. Most of us, however, require a few more tools and gear.
If you are trekking through the Yukon or trying to cross the Darien gap, you may find it necessary to wait weeks for help to reach you in a survival situation; but if you are just heading off to your local state park, emergency rescuers could probably reach you in a matter of hours. You’ll want to factor this consideration into your kit-building decisions. If you can expect to wait long periods before help will arrive, you’ll need more supplies than if you are heading out to an easily accessed area. Nevertheless, it is always wise to have the supplies to last longer than you think you’ll need them.

As expeditions became more remote—through jungles, over mountains, and across ice—people required a survival kit small enough to carry on their bodies. That led to innovations in gear like the Swiss Army Knife, MREs, small but powerful flashlights, and other space-saving, multiple-use tools. Survivalists also borrowed useful everyday items like duct tape, can openers, and batteries for their missions.
To my mind, the key to emphasizing skills over kit in bushcraft (or woodcraft/woodsmanship as I knew it growing up in the 60s) is to put kit items in a “make do” category. As in, “You can make do with a plastic tarp,” You can make do with a decent fixed blade knife,” “You can make do with a disposable lighter and/or a mishmetal rod,” “You can make do with a cheap, inexpensive flashlight/torch,” “You can make do with a decent mid-sized backpack,” etc. As a kid, I just wanted and needed whatever kit would work so that I could get into the jungles and explore, forage, and learn how to get along in the wilds, whether alone or with friends. Only AFTER I was exposed as a young adult to the social “value” of acquiring kit as a status totem and mark of “sophistication” did the weight and unwieldiness of my pack reach proportions that made my wilderness forays truly painful and counter productive to the easy passage I enjoyed as a teen. Fascination with kit is just the natural outcome of the consumer mentality that is destroying our environment and planet, and doesn’t belong in true bushcraft and the love and respect for nature. It is the skills you teach that open our hearts and minds to the wildness and beauty of our natural world.
If you find yourself in trouble and forced to walk to a local town or service station, you’ll want to be sure you have a small amount of money to help solve problems and allow you to get back home. You needn’t bring along thousands of dollars, enough to pay for a hotel room and some food is probably adequate. Be sure you convert your funds to local currency if you are traveling abroad. Always keep paper money in sealed plastic bags to protect it. You may even consider using a pre-paid debit card or a credit card in your survival kit, instead of cash. BUSHCRAFT TRIP - SNOW FALL, MAKING CARVING BENCH, REINDEER SKIN, FINNISH AXE, YAKUT KNIFE

As you can see there is a lot to learn!  While becoming a bushcraft master can take several years or longer the good news in that there are many small skills that can be quickly learned to get you started.  Additionally, some of the more basic skills like making cordage and batoning branches have many uses and can be applied to more than one discipline. 10 MOST INSANE SURVIVAL STORIES
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