Bushcraft is about thriving in the natural environment, and the acquisition of the skills and knowledge to do so. Bushcraft skills include firecraft, tracking, hunting, fishing, shelter-building, navigation by natural means, the use of tools such as knives and axes, foraging, water sourcing, hand-carving wood, container construction from natural materials, and rope and twine-making, among others.[citation needed]


Bushcraft is a diverse and extremely useful skill set to add to your survival arsenal.  This guide should help get you started but there is no teacher better than experience.  I challenge you to go out into the world and practice your bushcraft skills.  You will make yourself more confident, adaptable, and better prepared for whatever fate throws your way.  Always remember, Chance Favors The Well Prepared.

Shelter is an important aspect of every outdoor venture.  Your first layer of shelter is the clothing on your back, this provides you just enough to stay warm and dry for short periods of time. Your second layer of shelter is a stationary structure whether it is a small tent or a full blown log cabin. Knowing how to make shelter for you and your family is an important skill in Bushcraft.
The Morakniv Bushcraft Carbon Fixed Blade Knife is a beautiful thing to behold and lives up to its impressive profile by way of its 4.3 inch carbon steel blade, contoured handle and comparatively light weight. The blade here is tough enough to meet the demands of wild and won’t back down from its duty to help provide shelter and sustenance regardless of conditions. This is a knife that takes an edge easily and then manages to retain that razor sharp edge through the performance of multiple tasks.
Hi Paul, another excellent piece. With the exception of the morakniv, this is my basic kit. Unfortunately I was seduced by one of the bg knives by Gerber, sturdy but slightly large although this makes it excellent for batonning. I do usually use a tent, but thanks to you am progressing to the tarp and bivvy very nicely. I use a Bushbox xl for cooking, for 2 reasons. 1, it works very well and keeps the fire both contained and off the ground. And 2, I find it helps me practice my fire skills and I have greatly improved since I started using it. Have you tried it yourself?
The Runningsnail Solar Crank Weather Radio is also a AM/FM NOAA weather alert radio, but it also functions an SOS Alarm, flashlight, and phone charger. The SOS alarm and its flashing red light is a unique feature that could help you alert emergency responders for help in the most dire situations. This radio can be hand crank powered, solar charged, and it takes triple A batteries. It can also provide up to 12 hours of light or 4-6 hours of radio time with its 2000 mAh rechargeable battery. PROS: Can be charged via solar and has loud SOS alarm. CONS: No battery indicator on how much battery power is left. Image Courtesy of Amazon Solo 3 Days Bushcraft on a mountain lake, Canvas Lavvu tent, carving tongs and grill, cooking...
A recent interest in the skills of our forefathers led me to the man who started it all. This IS the man who taught everyone else.. A Must read if you are interested in bushcrafting and survival skills... Good illustrations and examples. Read this one first..All others are supplemental to this one. Check out the many videos Mr. Kochanski has on Youtube...many hours of valuable lessons on there as well..
Modern bushcraft gear is a list of essential tools used to help you survive in the wilderness. Things like fire starting, shelter building, cooking, and camping in the outdoors require some gear. What you chose to bring when you go out to practice bushcraft is up to you. You can bring everything you would need like when you go backpacking or just bring the gear and tools to survive.
Now of course you can camp out how however you want. Sleeping out in a tent doesn’t mean you are not doing bushcraft. Indeed in some parts of the world, even in the bush, it’s the best option to sleep in a tent. That said, one of the iconic methods of bushcraft camping is sleeping under a tarp. Whether you are sleeping on the ground or sleeping in a hammock, a tarp is a good shelter, providing a good amount of ground coverage for its weight in your pack.
You should start with the first things I write down here, and than going down on the list, you can take more and more with you. At first you need a knife and some cordage. Every pocket knife is ok for the beginning and every knife with a fix blade in a leather or plastic sheath too. If you have an old one, you have to look for somebody, who can sharpen it for you or can teach you how to sharpen it, what of course is better. You find old men, who have time for you in garden colonies for examples, you can just ask the people at a sunday, who is able to sharpen knifes. Farmers, joiners, carpenters and buchers know professional how to sharpen a knife too. If you can ask a farmer, you can use the chance, and ask him, if he allowes you to practise your outdoor skills on his land, somewhere next to a forest. If you want to make a fire in Germany, the landowner has to allow it to you, and you have to keep a distance of 100 meters to the next forest. That is a law, which protects people from burning the whole forest down. But you will find in that distance a nice corner with some bushes or a hedge, where you can put your little camp. (If in the beginning you do not know a farmer, that is not so important, because you can go in a forest or a place between some fields and practice your outdoor skills, theoreticly you are not allowed to build a nature shelter or a tent in the forest, only on farmers land if it is allowed, but so long you do not make fire, do not dig large holes in the earth and use only dead wood, laying on the ground and leave not to much cordage in the nature, and build only a small natural shelter or poncho or tarp tent, nobody will say anything angainst you.)
This is something you should take particular note of as many camping pots for sale in mainstream outdoor stores these days are designed to be used on gas burners or petrol camping stoves or similar. They are not designed to be hung over a fire and therefore they have no means of suspension. The billycan that has been adopted by many bushcrafters, making it almost standard issue is the stainless billy by Zebrahead. This is a high quality, robust stainless steel pot, which is very much worth the money. They come in a range of sizes, the most popular being 12cm, 14cm and 16 cm diameter pots. 12cm is good for individual use if you are looking for a compact pot although personally I find them a little small for cooking. 14cm is good for one to two people both for boiling water and cooking a decent meal.
This is not your average EDC knife. This is a big, aggressive blade that’s meant for heavy duty cutting and whittling, heavy duty cleaning of large game and even light wood chopping duties. The spine of the blade can be used to activate your firestarter and will send a generous shower of sparks raining down on your kindling, birch bark or whatever. The belt loop and sheath are both well-made and hold the blade securely while you hike or work around the campsite. All in all the condor Walnut Bushcraft Knife with its 4 ½ inch blade is up to whatever task you need it to perform. And it’s available at a very reasonable price. 5 DAYS eating ONLY WILD FOODS! | Survival Challenge | The Wilderness Living Challenge 2017 SEASON 2
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