The word has been used in its current sense in Australia and South Africa at least as far back as the 1800s. Bush in this sense is probably a direct adoption of the Dutch 'bosch', (now 'bos') originally used in Dutch colonies for woodland and country covered with natural wood, but extended to usage in British colonies, applied to the uncleared or un-farmed districts, still in a state of nature. Later this was used by extension for the country as opposed to the town. In Southern Africa, we get Bushman from the Dutch 'boschjesman' applied by the Dutch colonists to the natives living in the bush. In North America, where there was also considerable colonisation by the Dutch, you have the word 'bushwacker' which is close to the Dutch 'bosch-wachter' (now 'boswachter') meaning 'forest-keeper' or 'forest ranger'.
if anything, an unassuming three day dark blue or grey pack should be chosen with no external pockets and NOT the size of an expedition hiking pack. it’s no guarantee you won’t be attacked, but combined with ‘grey man’ style clothing, along with no exposed firearms or other weapons, it reduces the chance dramatically. you’ll be just another face in the crowd and almost ignored since they’ll notice the tactical and military-esque people before you. blend in and vanish is the best way to go.
the fiskars axe may have it’s fine points, but the handles have a history of cracking and/or breaking in cold weather and if the plastic shatters around the head, you end up with nothing but a nice wedge. in short, they’re not as indestructible as they’re made out to be. there are other and better options out there. for example, truper brand axes can be found on-line or at the local farm and feed for low prices. they’re not that bad of quality either; at least to everyone but your typical scandinavian hand forged axe fanboy snob. other options can be found at home depot or lowes. they’re not top quality, but they’re durable and hold an edge for a respectable amount of time. second hand shops that deal in antique tools are also known to carry hatchets and axes for dirt prices; even if it’s just a head.
Talk about good timing! I was just going to watch an episode of Ask Paul Kirtley as I have been wondering lately just about how much kit/gear/bells & whistles is absolutely necessary to start off with, and whether I’d gone overboard with my purchases. I was pleasantly surprised to see many items I’ve acquired to help me camp out mentioned in the article (Mora Companion, Bahco Laplander,DC4 stone, Firesteel, BCB mug).
If you are sleeping on the ground you’ll need an insulating sleeping mat to minimise heat loss to the ground as well as increase your physical comfort. Another thing that you’ll need is a bivvy bag. This is basically a windproof and waterproof bag for your sleeping bag. This serves several purposes. The first, as my description would suggest, is that it protects your sleeping bag from moisture both in terms of rain but also just in terms of dew. A bivvy bag makes your sleeping bag more windproof as it allows air warmed by your body to remain within the sleeping bag without being displaced by cold drafts. In addition a bivvy bag traps an additional layer of warm air around your sleeping bag, thus increasing the warmth of your sleeping system. Finally a bivvy bag protects your sleeping bag from dirt, which over time would degrade its performance.
In tropical areas, a survival kit may have mosquito head netting, additional insect repellent, anti-fungal cream, a machete, water purification tablets, foot powder, matches, a flint strike, a compass, a wire saw, a space blanket, medical equipment (gauze pads, elastic gauze bandage, antiseptic creams, anti-malaria tablets, anti-infection tablets, bandages, etc.), salt tablets, a fishing kit, snare wire, extra socks, a candle, a signal mirror, flares, a sewing kit, safety pins, tinder, tape, a whistle, and rations.
Generally speaking, the more outdoor experience you have, the fewer items you’ll need in your survival kit. Those who are quite skilled at starting campfires may not need to bring matches and emergency tinder; as a simple fire starter will suffice. Similarly, experienced outdoor enthusiasts may elect to bring items like garbage bags, rather than ponchos, as they can be used for a variety of different purposes, which outdoor novices are unlikely to have mastered.

If you do not find an old used knife, you get the Mora Knife 840 for 10,- € in every Bauhaus building side do it yourself shop. They sell it under the name “Bauhaus Arbeitsmesser, Mora 840”. It is there in a red sheath, and it is printed Bauhaus on, but that doesn’t matter! In other shops for gardening tools you get the “Fiskars K 40” for 10 € too, that is more or less the same knife.
Hi Pat, my recommendation does not contravene any UK law. I think what you are referring to is that you can only carry a non-locking blade of less than three inches without reasonable cause (e.g. a non-locking penknife). That said, there it is not illegal to own a fixed blade knife or lock knife or non-locking knife of more than three inches. Any knife can be considered an offensive weapon under certain circumstances. But this is no different to, say, a chisel. Just as a carpenter can carry tools to a job and use them on a job, so can an outdoors person take suitable (and legal) tools to the woods to use them.
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The undisputed experts when it comes to key survival gear? The rangers who save hikers who go astray. Jeff Webb, a search-and-rescue ranger at Yosemite National Park, has worked on more than 200 rescue missions. He's also seen action in Big Bend, Yellowstone, Canyonlands, Joshua Tree, and Rocky Mountain National Parks. With his advice, our editors put together this ultimate survival kit for hikers. Military Surplus Gear - Build a Survival Kit
When you head for the woods, you should think about taking a pocket-sized sharpening stone. Bench stones are too heavy to carry, unless you like carrying bricks around with you. While not strictly necessary for single day out, as you can sharpen your knife on a bench stone when back home, it is good practice to have the ability to sharpen your knife while you are out and about. If you blunt your knife while out, then you’ll need a small whetstone. If you head out for an overnight stay or longer, then a small pocket whetstone for the trail should definitely be in your kit. As the old saying goes, you are only as sharp as your knife. Top 10 Amazing SURVIVAL GADGETS Coming in 2019
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
Great book. For someone interested in living off of the grid (without dyin!)or any homesteader who's having trouble coming up with ideas for survival during the winter months. This book has it all,right down to some Euell Gibbons holistic remedies! A real outdoors survival 101 with illustrations and photos on everything from how to use tools...or heck...even how to make um! How to make twine and rope for binding. Tons of other useful information, and of course how to make different types of shelters. Taking everything nature has to help a human survive with little equipment from the modern world!
Don’t Starve focuses heavily on crafting to make your way through life, and so much of your time is spent harvesting raw materials. But rather than crafting houses like in Rust and Minecraft, this indie game is all about the tools and contraptions you can make. The Science Machine and Alchemy Engine will become your best friends, before making way for ancient wonders and the art of magic. Like Minecraft, Don’t Starve happily embraces the mad and the mystical, and is all the more enjoyable for it.

I may be a little biased about this one (since I wrote it), but I still believe this is a great addition to your outdoor survival library. The Ultimate Bushcraft Survival Manual will teach the reader how to survive in the wild with just their wits and a few tools, plus it is stuffed with great pictures and illustrations. Remember also that paper survival books are portable, long-lasting, invulnerable to cyber-attacks and completely EMP proof.


Whenever you are out and about, it is sensible to have a water bottle with you. A litre of water is a good minimum amount to carry with you. Water is heavy, though, with a litre of water weighting one kilogram. If you are out for more than a day, then you will have to procure some water while you are out. If you take a metal container then you can also boil water if you need to, using fire. Boiling is a very reliable method of making water safe to drink, as a rolling boil will kill all pathogenic organisms. I tend to carry a metal mug even when planning to be out for only the day, just in case. If you carry a water bottle and a metal mug with you then you can always produce and store drinking water free from disease-causing organisms anywhere you find it in the wilds.
You’ll face different potential emergencies in different conditions and during different activities. For example, you aren’t likely to suffer a sprained ankle while kayaking across a bay, but you may suffer from a jellyfish sting. Accordingly, a pain-relieving gel would be more helpful than an ace bandage in your first aid kit. Additionally, you may need a tick-removal kit if your travels take you through a forest, but you’ll find that a sunburn cream is more helpful while traveling through a desert.
How could you have a discussion about outdoor knives without including an entry from Buck? The Selkirk Fixed Blade Survival knife features a 4 ⅝ inch drop point 420 high carbon stainless steel blade and weighs in at a relatively stealthy 7.6 oz. It’s a great looking knife but it’s no gentleman. This bushcraft knife gets after wood, underbrush, game and anything else you need to process to advance your odds of survival. It boasts a contoured Micarta handle, full tang blade and steel bolster that can double as a hammer if needed.

The more traditional flint and steel generates smaller and cooler sparks but is very reliable if you prepare the necessary materials correctly and have good technique. The range of materials you can ignite is more limited than the modern devices but it’s worth experimenting with flint and steel once you get the hang of using a modern firesteel. This will extend your knowledge and understanding of natural fire lighting materials. New Henry Rifle US Survival Kit
This is something you should take particular note of as many camping pots for sale in mainstream outdoor stores these days are designed to be used on gas burners or petrol camping stoves or similar. They are not designed to be hung over a fire and therefore they have no means of suspension. The billycan that has been adopted by many bushcrafters, making it almost standard issue is the stainless billy by Zebrahead. This is a high quality, robust stainless steel pot, which is very much worth the money. They come in a range of sizes, the most popular being 12cm, 14cm and 16 cm diameter pots. 12cm is good for individual use if you are looking for a compact pot although personally I find them a little small for cooking. 14cm is good for one to two people both for boiling water and cooking a decent meal.
If you find yourself in trouble and forced to walk to a local town or service station, you’ll want to be sure you have a small amount of money to help solve problems and allow you to get back home. You needn’t bring along thousands of dollars, enough to pay for a hotel room and some food is probably adequate. Be sure you convert your funds to local currency if you are traveling abroad. Always keep paper money in sealed plastic bags to protect it. You may even consider using a pre-paid debit card or a credit card in your survival kit, instead of cash.
Due to the aggressive nature and unknown origin of the virus, the United Nations enforce an iron curtain surrounding the USA only to carry out multiple food drops. Only military flights are allowed to the continent of Northern America and trading over sea becomes forbidden. With the USA now totally isolated from the world, rumours tell of outbreaks in other countries. In November when winter settles down on the USA, most of the population has died. As sudden as the virus appeared, it vanished, leaving the few remaining people behind... Read more
Unfortunately, some outdoor enthusiasts find themselves being threatened by nefarious people or dangerous animals. This leads some to keep a weapon or self-defense tool in their survival kit, in order to be better prepared for a worst-case scenario. Your self-defense tool may take the form of a knife or gun, but be sure to consider less-than-lethal items too. This would include things like stun guns, pepper spray, and telescoping batons. Just be sure to follow all local laws and regulations before packing any type of weapon or self-defense tool in your survival kit.
One thing I would add to a basic set of items is a notebook or journal for sketching and recording events, objects and findings in. It doesn’t need to be anything Hi-Tec or all singing and dancing hi speed tactical, Just a simple A5 sketch pad or note book with a standard HB pencil, “one with the eraser on the end if you want to be posh”, and keep it all in a ziplock bag for weather protection.
When society collapses, a bicycle becomes the optimal mode of transportation. The Cream ($8,700), a mountain bike made by Spot Brand in Golden, Colorado, can handle smooth pavement and rugged wilderness trails alike. It's also low maintenance. The frame is sturdy titanium, and it's a single-speed, so no gearing to fuss over. The drivebelt needs no lube and is nearly silent—good for keeping a low profile.
Due to the aggressive nature and unknown origin of the virus, the United Nations enforce an iron curtain surrounding the USA only to carry out multiple food drops. Only military flights are allowed to the continent of Northern America and trading over sea becomes forbidden. With the USA now totally isolated from the world, rumours tell of outbreaks in other countries. In November when winter settles down on the USA, most of the population has died. As sudden as the virus appeared, it vanished, leaving the few remaining people behind... Read more
This obviously means you’ll have to balance your use of redundant items with your carrying capacity. However, you can address both of these competing forces by trying to bring along items that serve multiple purposes. This way, you aren’t really bringing items that are duplicates of each other, but you still benefit from having some backup options. For example, duct tape is often included to repair clothing or camping gear, but you can also use it as a band-aid in a pinch. Safety pins are another good multi-purpose supply, as they can be used for clothing repairs, bent into fishhooks or used to sew up a wound if need be.
They are more numerous, but more balanced. The bad ghouls have been nerfed, and will only attack from a certain number of days. Their diversity will also make them fewer, giving you more time to build a base. For those who think that the bases become useless, don't forget the importance of the low walls that will allow you to attack the ghouls without being touched, and without leaving your base, as well as the low doors. It is also important to build several doors in opposite places. If a ghoul could destroy one of your walls, flee to the other side. If a ghoul is chasing you, consider putting a building in a narrow path to block the road. If a ghoul chases you around a fire, you can turn around it, it will do the same. This will give you time to make a spear, or bow. But don't forget that if you want to be quiet, don't go looking for trouble! Bushcraft Wild Camping in the Rain - Making a Bucksaw in the Woods - Coffee and Bacon - Tarp Shelter
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