“I always carry a fixed-blade knife,” says Matthew Sanders, a retired Army Ranger who worked the aftermath of Irma and Harvey. “It’s good for a lot of jobs, and I can tie it to a stick for a hunting spear.” His knife requirements are simple: a stainless-steel blade around four inches or less, to abide by most state knife laws. The 4.4-inch TSR has a compartment in the handle that stores sewing needles, fishhooks, and line. The sheath holds a magnesium rod to spark a fire, a ceramic sharpening edge, and a signaling mirror. $90
Whenever you are out and about, it is sensible to have a water bottle with you. A litre of water is a good minimum amount to carry with you. Water is heavy, though, with a litre of water weighting one kilogram. If you are out for more than a day, then you will have to procure some water while you are out. If you take a metal container then you can also boil water if you need to, using fire. Boiling is a very reliable method of making water safe to drink, as a rolling boil will kill all pathogenic organisms. I tend to carry a metal mug even when planning to be out for only the day, just in case. If you carry a water bottle and a metal mug with you then you can always produce and store drinking water free from disease-causing organisms anywhere you find it in the wilds.
Military leaders know this, and it’s why everyone from the lowliest private to the most highly-trained Navy SEAL has a survival pack, perfected by soldiers and strategists over the centuries to contain all the gear necessary to get out of any kind of trouble they find themselves in. You can thank these government organizations for many of the tools and enhancements you rely on today in your urban bug out bag or get home bag.
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Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case. Into The Wild Day 1 Of 30 Day Survival Challenge Texas
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