To my mind, the key to emphasizing skills over kit in bushcraft (or woodcraft/woodsmanship as I knew it growing up in the 60s) is to put kit items in a “make do” category. As in, “You can make do with a plastic tarp,” You can make do with a decent fixed blade knife,” “You can make do with a disposable lighter and/or a mishmetal rod,” “You can make do with a cheap, inexpensive flashlight/torch,” “You can make do with a decent mid-sized backpack,” etc. As a kid, I just wanted and needed whatever kit would work so that I could get into the jungles and explore, forage, and learn how to get along in the wilds, whether alone or with friends. Only AFTER I was exposed as a young adult to the social “value” of acquiring kit as a status totem and mark of “sophistication” did the weight and unwieldiness of my pack reach proportions that made my wilderness forays truly painful and counter productive to the easy passage I enjoyed as a teen. Fascination with kit is just the natural outcome of the consumer mentality that is destroying our environment and planet, and doesn’t belong in true bushcraft and the love and respect for nature. It is the skills you teach that open our hearts and minds to the wildness and beauty of our natural world.
You should look at a free market, where people sell used things, for equipment that you need. Often you get a knife, a simple steel spoon, a military pot, a rucksack or a summer sleeping bag very cheap at markets like that, especially, if you tell the people, that you do not have so much money and want to go with your friend for a bit camping in your local forest. The people, who sell that old things will normally give it you very cheap, especially if you are young.
Eat and drink to survive, with different foods having different nutritional values (including human meat!). All actions drain food and water, and long-distance travel is draining. Inventory weight slows you down, and the day/night cycle and weather alter the environment. Craft clothing, build shelter, and use fire to protect yourself against damage & the elements.
Love your blog, and this was another great article. I’m a budding US outdoorsman, meaning I spend more time reading and learning about outdoor life/ bushcraft / survivalism than I actually get to practice it. After reading this article, I had the thought to search for an agenda for a bushcraft excursion, both a day trip and an overnight trip. What I mean is a checklist of things to accomplish, like one might get from a class in order to demonstrate what has been learned. ie, navigate to a location, process wood and make a fire, set up a shelter (for overnight trips), and so on.
At Bauhaus you will get a tarp for buildingside use too, they are called in german “Gewebeösenplane”. Unfortunatly the 2 x 3 meter tarp you need they sell in the moment only in white colour for 6 euro. The smallest they offer in green is 5 x 3 meters, and that is to large for you. It will fly away in the next wind. So if you do not find in an other shop a green buildingside tarp with 2 x 3 or 3x 3 metrs, you should take for the beginning the white one, if you have not the chance to get one of the following much better options: You should buy at next a used original German Bundeswehr Poncho in oliv for 20 € or the woodland camouflage DPM from the dutch army, which is a bit larger for 25,-€. You can use this as a raincoat,what is in the german summer better than a goretexjacket with trousers. You can use the militaryponcho also as a tarp or tent. ( I own the best mountaineering two persons tent of the world market, the Hilleberg Nallo, which costs nearly 1000 €, but if i do not go in the mountains, or other stormy areas, i use my old Bundeswehr poncho, because it is lighter, and you are with that directly in the nature, and not locked in a closed plastic room, so that simple poncho is very good, i want to say.)
For all the stress that some survival games can press on you, nothing compares to the harrowing 2D adventure. As you’ll find out in our This War of Mine review, the game offers a very different breed of survival. It’s a depiction of a group of civilians’ struggling to stay alive in their war-ravaged country. Trapped in a besieged house, pinned down by snipers, and attacked by other survivors looking to take what you’ve found, it’s a game of traumatic decisions and life-or-death consequences. It’s the side of conflict that few war games truly deal with.

People who own a few horses or rabbits can give you some strong cordage for free, if they feed the animals with hay in rectangular bundles. On your way into the forest you will find them. Don’t forget to take some sandwiches, water in a 1 liter plastic bottle from the supermarket and some toilet paper with you. (what has to be diged in after use, it is intelligent to dig the hole with a strong stick before you use it. In Germany you do not burn toilet paper in the summer, like they do it in Britain. German forests are to dry, the risk to burn them down is to high!).
Type of Steel - Most bushcraft knives have stainless steel blades of one sort or another. High carbon steel is commonly used because it’s durable and holds a razor sharp edge for a long time. But it’s also prone to corrosion, so if you’re going to purchase a bushcraft knife with a high carbon blade it should be coated or otherwise treated in some fashion to make it more corrosion resistant.
Astroneer is one of the best games to come from Steam’s Early Access platform: solid at launch, but transformed into something truly special after two years of consistent content updates and polishing. In Astroneer you crash land on an alien planet and carve out an existence by developing your life support pod into a fully fledged base replete with vehicles, power sources, and laboratories. Of course, as in all the best survival games, you’ll need a lot of resources to start building the best base modules, and to do that you’ll need to explore your planet hoovering up rare crafting materials and shaping the terrain to unearth resource-rich caverns.
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7] SURVIVAL - THE TRUE SURVIVALKIT (what you REALLY need to stay alive)
This bushcraft knife will enable you to perform whatever tasks are required to secure yourself food and shelter in the wild under any conditions. Whether you’re building a blind or an emergency shelter to protect you from record snowfall the Spyderco Plain Edge bushcraft knife will be there for you. The O-1 stainless steel used in the blade is an oil hardening tool steel that exhibits excellent wear and is renowned for retaining a good cutting edge. It’s used here to give you an advantage over nature that always seems to be holding all the cards, especially if you’re lost or hurt far from camp. With the Plain Edge Knife on your belt you’ll level the playing field a bit and give yourself a fighting chance. It’s comfortable, well balanced, light, durable and tough as nails and while you’ll pay a little more for it you won’t be disappointed with what you get.
Bushcraft is the art of using the resources provided by our natural environment to survive and thrive in the great outdoors.  It combines the knowledge of how to best use the plants and animals at your disposal with some basic bushcraft tools to make outdoor living easier and more efficient.  In learning bushcraft skills we benefit in many ways including:
Originally prototyped as a multiplayer version of Fallout 4 with the goal of envisioning what an online Fallout game might look like, Fallout 76 has evolved quite a bit over the past few years, those sources said. It will have quests and a story, like any other game from Bethesda Game Studios, a developer known for meaty RPGs like Skyrim. It will also feature base-building—just like 2015's Fallout 4—and other survival-based and multiplayer mechanics, according to those sources. One source cautioned that the gameplay is rapidly changing, like it does in many online “service” games, but that’s the core outline.
I love UCO’s Stormproof Matches. They’ll burn in a downpour. You can even strike them, stick the lit match in a glass of water, pull it out and it will re-light like some kind of magic trick. But UCO isn’t a one-trick-pony, and those remarkable matches aren’t the only tool they provide for our survival. The UCO Stormproof Torch can take your fire building to a whole new level, blasting out flames from their patented triple jet system. This pint-sized blowtorch is actually a refillable butane lighter, and it’s one of the fiercest on the market. The triple jet torch is windproof and water-proof, with an adjustable flame to conserve fuel (or let it roar). Each lighter holds enough butane for roughly 700 ignitions, and it ignites with a piezo-electric ignition system that is rated for 30,000 uses. Keep in mind that you’ll have to purchase the fuel separately and fill the lighter yourself (due to hazardous material shipping regulations); but this is easy to do and well worth the trouble. The UCO Stormproof Torch is a fire on demand, even in the wettest weather.
TREE SACKS ARE LIGHT WEIGHT, EASILY PACKED, AND PROVIDE COMFORT WHEREVER YOU ARE! The Tree Sack is just 15.75 oz. with lots of room for a single at 9ft long by 4½ ft wide. The Tree Sack Double is just 25 oz. and has all the space you need being 10ft long by 6½ ft wide. The Tree Sack holding bag allows you to stuff the entire hammock, straps, and carabiner into one small unit. This makes carrying or packing the Tree Sack in your backpack a breeze! Great New Survival Gear for 2019

The modern sparking devices known variously as a Swedish Firesteel, fireflash or ferro rod are the most widely applicable gadgets for creating sparks. The sparks they produce are bright white (i.e. very hot) and relatively large, thus the range of different materials that they ignite is the broadest of any of the sparking devices. I would recommend investing in one of these and learning to generate good sparks with it. Then see what you can ignite with your sparks. Do be careful in dry conditions, however, as fires can quickly spread even from the smallest sparks. Remember to seek the correct permissions needed to have a fire in your jurisdiction.
Lastly we have the pack that you carry all your bushcraft tools and other gear in.  As highlighted in my article on how to choose a backpack (read it here), make sure you pick a comfortable bag that matches your body type and that you can comfortably carry.  It is also important that your bushcraft backpack is waterproof and has multiple compartments rather than one large sack.  This makes it far easier to efficiently organize and then find your gear when you want to use it!
95% of all survival situations are resolved within 72 hours, but the first 72 hours are extremely critical. Having the right gear can mean the difference between life and death. With that in mind, we worked closely with first responders, doctors, special forces operators, mountain guides and other experts to develop the world's best seventy two hour survival kit, a product that changes a potentially deadly situation in to a minor inconvenience.
It turns out that "Bushcraft" published in 2014 is WORD FOR WORD THE SAME as "Northern Bushcraft" published in 1988. There are no changes to the text or illustrations in the body of the text. The only "update" is a 14 page supplement with color illustrations at the end of the book. I am sorry, but changing the title and copyright date with essentially no other changes to the book amounts to a "bait and switch." I do not blame Mors for this. He is now elderly. I blame the publisher.
If you are into practical wilderness skills, then this book is for you. If you look at your mind and what you know as your greates wilderness tool, this book is for you. If you are enamored with expensive gear and gadgets and wilderness living via the latest fads, look elsewhere. I live in the SE United States, far away from the boreal forest but many of the skills in this book apply here.

The modern sparking devices known variously as a Swedish Firesteel, fireflash or ferro rod are the most widely applicable gadgets for creating sparks. The sparks they produce are bright white (i.e. very hot) and relatively large, thus the range of different materials that they ignite is the broadest of any of the sparking devices. I would recommend investing in one of these and learning to generate good sparks with it. Then see what you can ignite with your sparks. Do be careful in dry conditions, however, as fires can quickly spread even from the smallest sparks. Remember to seek the correct permissions needed to have a fire in your jurisdiction.
If you are sleeping on the ground you’ll need an insulating sleeping mat to minimise heat loss to the ground as well as increase your physical comfort. Another thing that you’ll need is a bivvy bag. This is basically a windproof and waterproof bag for your sleeping bag. This serves several purposes. The first, as my description would suggest, is that it protects your sleeping bag from moisture both in terms of rain but also just in terms of dew. A bivvy bag makes your sleeping bag more windproof as it allows air warmed by your body to remain within the sleeping bag without being displaced by cold drafts. In addition a bivvy bag traps an additional layer of warm air around your sleeping bag, thus increasing the warmth of your sleeping system. Finally a bivvy bag protects your sleeping bag from dirt, which over time would degrade its performance.
As the weather gets colder, I really appreciate all of these articles! I will be going out for a 2 night/3 day trip this weekend. I have my base camp built, an LLbean Pine Tent. But I will be trying tarp camping in November. My problem has always been that I bring too much. So your articles are very helpful. I am working hard to reduce. I use a Bio-lite stove, which is light weight, and practical for me. I can cook all my meals on it without using a lot of fuel. I particularly like your idea about the bivy bag for my sleeping bag, as that always gets dirty fast and I have to have it cleaned often. I have my favorite kitchen knife with me always, but I haven´t tried carving yet, so I will use your suggestions for a knife. A saw is also a good idea.
If you find yourself in trouble and forced to walk to a local town or service station, you’ll want to be sure you have a small amount of money to help solve problems and allow you to get back home. You needn’t bring along thousands of dollars, enough to pay for a hotel room and some food is probably adequate. Be sure you convert your funds to local currency if you are traveling abroad. Always keep paper money in sealed plastic bags to protect it. You may even consider using a pre-paid debit card or a credit card in your survival kit, instead of cash. BUSHCRAFT TRIP - SNOW FALL, MAKING CARVING BENCH, REINDEER SKIN, FINNISH AXE, YAKUT KNIFE
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