What’s a bivvy? Glad you asked. The modern term refers to a weatherproof bag that is used in the wilderness or in an emergency setting to provide shelter (typically for one person, like a sleeping bag). We get the word from the UK (where they spell it with two “V”s), and it’s based on the more familiar word bivouac (meaning a temporary encampment). A bivy can be used in conjunction with a sleeping bag, to create a more weather resistant shell, or a heat reflecting liner. Or the bag can be used as a standalone shelter. Items like these have been on the market for years, but as materials improve – their weight keeps dropping and their effectiveness is increasing. Enter the TACT Bivvy Emergency Sleeping Bag from Survival Frog. This tight-packing bivy is made from our HeatEcho™ thermal reflective material to hold in your precious body heat. Like a space blanket, these remarkable materials can reflect back as much as 90% of your body heat. The bag is also windproof, waterproof and reinforced with taped seams. These are a great survival resource for your vehicle (particularly in the winter), but they’re a great fit in your survival kit or bug out bag too. Each one packs down small into nylon stuff sack provided, and they weigh less than 5 ounces each. There is a bright orange version, perfect for assisting SAR crews in finding you. You can also get a green version, for a lower profile in the wild. Either way, it’s a feather-weight shelter that fits in the palm of your hand!
Bushcraft is a popular term for wilderness survival skills. The term was popularized in the Southern Hemisphere by Les Hiddins (the Bush Tucker Man) as well as in the Northern Hemisphere by Mors Kochanski and recently gained considerable currency in the United Kingdom due to the popularity of Ray Mears and his bushcraft and survival television programs.[1] It is also becoming popular in urban areas where the average person is separated from nature, as a way to get back in tune with their rural roots.[citation needed] The origin of the phrase "bushcraft" comes from skills used in the bush country of Australia. Often the phrase "wilderness skills" is used as it describes skills used all over the world.[citation needed]
Hi Paul, another excellent piece. With the exception of the morakniv, this is my basic kit. Unfortunately I was seduced by one of the bg knives by Gerber, sturdy but slightly large although this makes it excellent for batonning. I do usually use a tent, but thanks to you am progressing to the tarp and bivvy very nicely. I use a Bushbox xl for cooking, for 2 reasons. 1, it works very well and keeps the fire both contained and off the ground. And 2, I find it helps me practice my fire skills and I have greatly improved since I started using it. Have you tried it yourself?

If you must take regular medications for a medical condition, you’ll likely want to pack an extra set in your survival kit. You’ll need to discuss the issue with your doctor if you require prescription medications, but don’t forget about over-the-counter medications you may need too. For example, if you often suffer from heartburn, you’ll likely want to add some antacids to your survival kit. Similarly, if you have allergies, you’ll want to pack extra antihistamines, and you may even want to include an EpiPen if an anaphylactic shock is possible.
A: Bushcraft knives are used to build shelter, start and maintain fires, collect water (think carving through ice on a frozen stream), make secondary tools like batons or spears for catching fish, prepare food and for self-defense and rescue. But since the blade on a bushcraft knife is typically big and sharp you have to know how to wield it or your savior could wind up being your enemy. In order to wield your bushcraft knife safely then make sure you:
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!
Multi-tools have come a long way from their simple origins. Gerber’s Center-Drive multi-tool provides full size tools in a compactly designed folding package. The Center Axis bit driver works like a real screw driver and magnetically holds any standard driver bit (the tool comes with a sleeve of 12 assorted bits). It even has one-hand opening plier jaws that open with a flick of your thumb. The knife blade is 420HC steel and 3.25 inches long. The tool also has a saw, wire cutter, pry bar with nail puller, bottle opener, awl and file. The Center-Drive is made in the USA. $165 AmmoCan Survival Kit
In an ideal world, you’d bring along duplicates for every item in your survival kit. This way, if one breaks, you’ve got a back up at the ready. “Two is one, and one is none,” as the saying goes. But in the real world, your outdoor activities will place weight and space restrictions on the size of your survival kit. You can’t very well bring multiple knives, several flashlights and two pairs of pliers if you are trying to go ultralight camping in the Sierra Nevadas.
The Schrade Extreme Survival Knife lives up to its name with a 6 ⅜ inch 1095 high carbon stainless steel blade and a beautiful ring-textured contoured handle that arcs ever so slightly forward so you can maximize the force you bring to bear on the task. The drop point blade is full tang and can easily handle tasks you wouldn’t normally assign to a knife like splitting logs. It’s a beast of a bushcraft knife and one that can take down a branch or a wolf, should you have the bad luck to encounter one.
This is not your average EDC knife. This is a big, aggressive blade that’s meant for heavy duty cutting and whittling, heavy duty cleaning of large game and even light wood chopping duties. The spine of the blade can be used to activate your firestarter and will send a generous shower of sparks raining down on your kindling, birch bark or whatever. The belt loop and sheath are both well-made and hold the blade securely while you hike or work around the campsite. All in all the condor Walnut Bushcraft Knife with its 4 ½ inch blade is up to whatever task you need it to perform. And it’s available at a very reasonable price. 5 DAYS eating ONLY WILD FOODS! | Survival Challenge | The Wilderness Living Challenge 2017 SEASON 2
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