When you head for the woods, you should think about taking a pocket-sized sharpening stone. Bench stones are too heavy to carry, unless you like carrying bricks around with you. While not strictly necessary for single day out, as you can sharpen your knife on a bench stone when back home, it is good practice to have the ability to sharpen your knife while you are out and about. If you blunt your knife while out, then you’ll need a small whetstone. If you head out for an overnight stay or longer, then a small pocket whetstone for the trail should definitely be in your kit. As the old saying goes, you are only as sharp as your knife. Top 10 Amazing SURVIVAL GADGETS Coming in 2019

Love your blog, and this was another great article. I’m a budding US outdoorsman, meaning I spend more time reading and learning about outdoor life/ bushcraft / survivalism than I actually get to practice it. After reading this article, I had the thought to search for an agenda for a bushcraft excursion, both a day trip and an overnight trip. What I mean is a checklist of things to accomplish, like one might get from a class in order to demonstrate what has been learned. ie, navigate to a location, process wood and make a fire, set up a shelter (for overnight trips), and so on.
We have all types of survival games, so if you prefer to jump around as a ninja while avoiding deadly obstacles and collecting shiny coins you should try out the endless runner Ninja Action. How far can you go before you die? If you are more into gunning down zombies and throwing around explosive grenades you should take on the role as a real cowboy in Cowboy Shoot Zombies. How many zombies are you able to kill before they get the best of you?
This satellite communi­cation device puts you in constant texting contact with Search and Rescue teams in case of an emergency. In less dire times, you can email or text family and friends, and post to social media (if that’s the type of adventurer you choose to be), whether you have cell service or not. It will also track your movement and allow those you authorize to check in on your location. 
In addition, the kits may contain typical individual "survival kit" items, such as nylon tarps, extra clothes and coats, blankets, sleeping bags, matches or other fire starting equipment, a compass and maps, flashlights, toilet paper, soap, a pocket knife and bowie knife, a fishing kit, a portable camping stove, a power inverter, backpack, paper and pencil, a signaling mirror, whistle, cable saw, bleach, insect repellent, magnifying glass, rope and nylon cord, pulleys, and a pistol and ammunition.
Even if you don’t intend to be out in the woods beyond the end of the day, I’d recommend you take a head torch just in case you’re out longer than anticipated. If you are benighted, then having a head torch with you could make the difference between being forced to spend the night in the woods or making a call for help and arriving safely back at your intended destination, albeit late.
<li>SEARCH AND RESCUE: Easily signal your position to rescuers with a 100-decibel Slim Rescue Howler rescue whistle and Rescue Flash signal mirror with retro-reflective aiming aid. Also including a compass to keep you bearings straight, this survival kit stores in a professional-grade RF-welded waterproof bag to keep contents dry in any conditions. </li> Ultimate 750 Piece Fire Starting Survival Kit
I became interested in Mors Kochanski after learning about his "Super Shelters." A most useful adaptation of the Super Shelter concept is the "Harlton Hacienda" developed by Mors' assistant instructor. This shelter can be set up in minutes and keep you alive in the most bitter cold (although it reportedly may require a pickup truck size pile of small firewood to heat overnight). I had access to Mors' "Northern Buschcraft" published in 1988 and widely regarded as a classic on bushcraft in the Canadian boreal forest. There is no mention of the super shelters in this book, but it is old. Along comes a "new" book by Mors with a new title "Bushcraft" published in 2014. Mors' is clearly very proud of his super shelter concept in his youtube videos, yet there is no mention whatsoever of these shelters in his "brand new" book. Why?

Eat and drink to survive, with different foods having different nutritional values (including human meat!). All actions drain food and water, and long-distance travel is draining. Inventory weight slows you down, and the day/night cycle and weather alter the environment. Craft clothing, build shelter, and use fire to protect yourself against damage & the elements.
Ben had some good ideas. Hiking in the back mountains of Cape Town can sometimes be tricky as being off the beaten track it is not often you will see anyone. I suggest flares to light up the night sky to attract overhead planes. Also a really powerful long range torch (flashlight) is a must as it will also light up a huge part of the mountain and this will ensure one’s safety. Condoms! Yes but it is not what you think – condoms come in handy to waterproof bandages or protect and prevent irritating blisters. Also handy to keep items like your cell phone waterproof. Chapstick – great for soothing burns and bites and takes the itchiness away. Spare socks.
TREE SACKS ARE LIGHT WEIGHT, EASILY PACKED, AND PROVIDE COMFORT WHEREVER YOU ARE! The Tree Sack is just 15.75 oz. with lots of room for a single at 9ft long by 4½ ft wide. The Tree Sack Double is just 25 oz. and has all the space you need being 10ft long by 6½ ft wide. The Tree Sack holding bag allows you to stuff the entire hammock, straps, and carabiner into one small unit. This makes carrying or packing the Tree Sack in your backpack a breeze! Wild island survival challenge - Survival skills on desert island (part 2)
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