As the weather gets colder, I really appreciate all of these articles! I will be going out for a 2 night/3 day trip this weekend. I have my base camp built, an LLbean Pine Tent. But I will be trying tarp camping in November. My problem has always been that I bring too much. So your articles are very helpful. I am working hard to reduce. I use a Bio-lite stove, which is light weight, and practical for me. I can cook all my meals on it without using a lot of fuel. I particularly like your idea about the bivy bag for my sleeping bag, as that always gets dirty fast and I have to have it cleaned often. I have my favorite kitchen knife with me always, but I haven´t tried carving yet, so I will use your suggestions for a knife. A saw is also a good idea.
Let’s get all the sophomoric jokes out of the way. In this context, the “pocket rocket” moniker refers to an ultralight camp stove that is perfect for backcountry hunters, long-distance hikers, bug-out preppers, and anyone else who may need to cook a hot meal quickly while off the grid. The Pocket Rocket 2 is half the weight of the first version, and it can boil a quart of water in only three and a half minutes. Of course, you’ll need a fuel canister to provide the heat (isobutane-propane fuel canisters are designed to fit this stove, and they offer great temperature and altitude tolerance). Once the self-sealing fuel canister is screwed into place, using the stove is a breeze. The serrated pot-supports can hold a variety of pots and pans. The adjustable flame can go low to simmer food, high for a fast boil, or anywhere in between. You can even use it like a blowtorch to start a stubborn campfire. The stove also comes with a lightweight case for protection, and it easily packs down to store in your cookpot (or your pocket).
This satellite communi­cation device puts you in constant texting contact with Search and Rescue teams in case of an emergency. In less dire times, you can email or text family and friends, and post to social media (if that’s the type of adventurer you choose to be), whether you have cell service or not. It will also track your movement and allow those you authorize to check in on your location.  5 Great Camping & Outdoor Survival Gear 2019
When you head for the woods, you should think about taking a pocket-sized sharpening stone. Bench stones are too heavy to carry, unless you like carrying bricks around with you. While not strictly necessary for single day out, as you can sharpen your knife on a bench stone when back home, it is good practice to have the ability to sharpen your knife while you are out and about. If you blunt your knife while out, then you’ll need a small whetstone. If you head out for an overnight stay or longer, then a small pocket whetstone for the trail should definitely be in your kit. As the old saying goes, you are only as sharp as your knife. Top 10 Amazing SURVIVAL GADGETS Coming in 2019
This bushcraft knife makes no secret of its intentions to make short work of your survival related tasks. When you do put it to work you realize that all those factors that make it so physically attractive also make is so physically imposing and effective. The full tang drop point blade will pierce, notch, chop, slice and dice until the cows come home while the grip jimping on the textured TPE handle ensures that your hand stays in place and the blade is always properly aligned to address whatever material needs attention. The Frontier is a fairly heavy knife but you’d expect nothing less from a 10 ½ inch full tang bushcraft knife. Frankly, if it were lighter it wouldn’t do as good a job. Comes with heavy duty black nylon sheath, sharpening stone and ferro rod to up your survival odds. How to Build a Survival Kit
Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.
One thing I would add to a basic set of items is a notebook or journal for sketching and recording events, objects and findings in. It doesn’t need to be anything Hi-Tec or all singing and dancing hi speed tactical, Just a simple A5 sketch pad or note book with a standard HB pencil, “one with the eraser on the end if you want to be posh”, and keep it all in a ziplock bag for weather protection.

Great article as always. I’m currently working on improving my knowledge of wild edibles, tree ID and animal tracking. My own studies have benefitted no end from carrying a small camera. Usually I just use my cell phone camera. This may not sound too bushcrafty, but I also keep a bunch of field guides, track ID apps, bird song recordings e.t.c. on my phone, and frequently use the phones microphone to record the calls of unfamiliar birds, frogs e.t.c. I’d never suggest people rely on a cell phone for navigation though: I never go out without a compass.

"description": "The Professional Version of the Bleeding Control Kit contains the necessary items to control serious bleeding and prevent further blood loss for a victim suffering a traumatic injury. The compact kit has a well laid-out interior that allows easy access to the components inside. It can easily be stored in places such as a car, backpack, office drawer, or cabinet at home. The included instructions prioritize which injuries to treat with the appropriate components. The instructions detail how to treat massive spurting blood loss with a tourniquet and how to treat a wound oozing blood with direct pressure using the gauze and hemostatic agent (only included in Professional Kit).
The bare minimum, as far as gear goes, includes just enough to survive. What the means is up to you. If you read the popular book Hatchet, where a young boy experienced a plane crash and only had a hatchet to survive, you know a lot can get done. However, you can pack a lot into a small backpack to use for bushcraft and wilderness survival. Common tools include: Solo Survival: How to Survive Alone in the Wilderness for 1 week --Eastern Woodlands
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