The bare minimum, as far as gear goes, includes just enough to survive. What the means is up to you. If you read the popular book Hatchet, where a young boy experienced a plane crash and only had a hatchet to survive, you know a lot can get done. However, you can pack a lot into a small backpack to use for bushcraft and wilderness survival. Common tools include: Solo Survival: How to Survive Alone in the Wilderness for 1 week --Eastern Woodlands
In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.

Have you ever looked at a wild plant or bush, and wondered if you could eat it?  For the Bushcrafter, foraging is very important element to survival.  All hunters and fisherman know that if it was easy, they would not call it hunting and fishing, they would call it catching.  Being able to identify and eat plants without getting sick can make the difference between surviving and not surviving.
In spite of what it might sound like bushcrafting isn’t the art of turning shrubbery into sculptures, it’s the method by which people survive in the wild. Some of the tools of the bushcrafter include the compass, the firestarter, the tactical flashlight and other things like emergency blankets and a tactical or field watch. Of course maybe the most important item when it comes to effective bushcrafting is the knife. The best bushcraft knife will allow you to harvest wood for fires, cut small branches to build a shelter, carve tent stakes, clean fish and small game and defend yourself if the need arises. It’s an all-purpose knife but with a more heavy duty task list than the average Swiss Army Knife. Below we’re going to look at the best bushcraft knives on the market today as chosen by our product review team.
Webb's includes an aspirin- and ibuprofen-filled pill bottle wrapped in duct tape and medical tape, a couple of gauze pads bound in a rubber band, and a standard gauze roll and a Kerlix gauze roll. It's enough gear to "stop a bleed and wrap it tight with the tape, or wrap a sprain and take the pain meds," he says. Webb packs it all in a Norelco shaver case. Into The Wild Day 1 Of 30 Day Survival Challenge Texas
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